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Gender in Media News

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

⁣🤝Intersectionality matters!⁣⠀

The vast majority of leads from the past decade are white, 83.4%, while less than one-in-five are leads of color 16.7%. Among leads of color, 74.0% are male, while 26.0% are female. ⁣⠀
This means that the gender gap in leading roles in even more pronounced for leads of color than white leads.⁣⠀
⁣⠀
To read the full report visit our link in bio⁣⠀
seejane.org/research-informs-empowers/the-geena-benchmark-report-2007-2017/
... See MoreSee Less

⁣🤝Intersectionality matters!⁣⠀
⠀
The vast majority of leads from the past decade are white, 83.4%, while less than one-in-five are leads of color 16.7%. Among leads of color, 74.0% are male, while 26.0% are female. ⁣⠀
This means that the gender gap in leading roles in even more pronounced for leads of color than white leads.⁣⠀
⁣⠀
To read the full report visit our link in bio⁣⠀
https://seejane.org/research-informs-empowers/the-geena-benchmark-report-2007-2017/

Monday, February 18, 2019

🚨 Attention NY members!⠀

Our Black History Month celebration is only a couple days away!⠀

Join us for the 20th anniversary celebration of Tryin’ to Sleep in the Bed You Made, by New York Times best-selling authors, Virginia DeBerry and Donna Grant at 72andSunny in Brooklyn. The event will feature stage readings performed by actors Roseanne Chery, Magaly Colimon, Henry Lennix, Lisa Wilkerson from the award-winning and beloved DeBerry and Grant novels followed by a panel discussion.⠀

The authors themselves will be joining us on panel with amazing talents Yolonda Brinkley founder of Diversity in Cannes, Henry Lennix actor on The Blacklist, and Tyrha M. Lindsey-Warren, PhD, MBA⠀
business executive, artist, entrepreneur and emerging academic marketing scholar.⠀

We hope to see you there!⠀
To RSVP and learn more follow the link in biohttps://seejane.org/membership/see-jane-salon-tryin-to-sleep-in-the-bed-you-made-nyc/




#GeenaDavis #womeninfilm #girlsinfilm #girlsinmedia #ifshecanseeitshecanbeit #womeninhollywood #womeninmedia #genderequality #movies #womeninfilm #filmmaking #film #filmmaker #director #screenwriting #cinema #onset #filming #femalefilmmaker #representationmatters
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Monday, February 18, 2019

🌟 Let's make a change!⠀
⠀⠀
Our benchmark study finds that while progress has been made for female leading characters, women are far from achieving parity with men as leads in family films. Leads of color remain underrepresented in family films, although this has improved somewhat in the past few years. LGBTQIA individuals and people with disabilities are rarely featured as protagonists in family films, and no measurable progress has occurred in the last decade. The film industry largely prides itself on being progressive, but continues to tell mostly stories about the lives of straight, white men without disabilities in family films.⠀


Change can start from behind the screens first.⠀
Learn more from our full report, visit our link in bio⠀https://seejane.org/research-informs-empowers/the-geena-benchmark-report-2007-2017/
... See MoreSee Less

🌟 Lets make a change!⠀
⠀⠀
Our benchmark study finds that while progress has been made for female leading characters, women are far from achieving parity with men as leads in family films. Leads of color remain underrepresented in family films, although this has improved somewhat in the past few years. LGBTQIA individuals and people with disabilities are rarely featured as protagonists in family films, and no measurable progress has occurred in the last decade. The film industry largely prides itself on being progressive, but continues to tell mostly stories about the lives of straight, white men without disabilities in family films.⠀
⠀
⠀
Change can start from behind the screens first.⠀
Learn more from our full report, visit our link in bio⠀https://seejane.org/research-informs-empowers/the-geena-benchmark-report-2007-2017/

 

Comment on Facebook

The link doesn’t seem to be working. Please fix cause I’d love to see the full report.

Saturday, February 16, 2019

🎉Have you been to our events?

From panels, screenings, and symposiums, we love our events!⠀

Meet Geena, directors, writers, producers, and ⠀
engage with an exclusive community of like-minded individuals, all passionate and committed to eliminating unconscious bias and ensuring gender equality for our children today and tomorrow.⠀

Photos taken from our 2018 LA Symposium where we tackled the issue of lack of representation of STEM female characters in media.⠀

To join us for our events become a member!Learn more through the link in bio.⠀
seejane.org/membership/
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Comment on Facebook

Any chance you can do an event in Bay Area or Sacramento? We would love to bring our daughters. Also, thank you for all the amazing work you and your team do to promote gender equity.

Friday, February 15, 2019

We need to see more representation!⠀
Everyone deserves to see themselves on the screen. ⠀

In the U.S., 18.7% of people have a physical or cognitive disability, but their stories are rarely told in family films:9⠀
Fewer than 1% of leading characters (0.9%) were shown as a person with a disability in the top grossing family films of the last decade.⠀

In our benchmark report we analyze the identity of leads in the top grossing family films from 2007 to 2017 to see whether Hollywood content creators have made progress when it comes to telling the stories of traditionally marginalized groups. ⠀


To read the full report vist our link in bio.⠀
seejane.org/research-informs-empowers/the-geena-benchmark-report-2007-2017/
... See MoreSee Less

We need to see more representation!⠀
Everyone deserves to see themselves on the screen. ⠀
⠀
In the U.S., 18.7% of people have a physical or cognitive disability, but their stories are rarely told in family films:9⠀
Fewer than 1% of leading characters (0.9%) were shown as a person with a disability in the top grossing family films of the last decade.⠀
⠀
In our benchmark report we analyze the identity of leads in the top grossing family films from 2007 to 2017 to see whether Hollywood content creators have made progress when it comes to telling the stories of traditionally marginalized groups. ⠀
⠀
⠀
To read the full report vist our link in bio.⠀
https://seejane.org/research-informs-empowers/the-geena-benchmark-report-2007-2017/⠀

 

Comment on Facebook

Some people: "Why do we have to be so politically correct and have movies about people with disabilities (12.6% of the population), LGBT people (10%) of the population or women (over 50% of the population)?" Those same people: "Ooooh, another movie about a psychopath!" (1% of the population).

The point is always the story. There has to be a compelling story. Simply having a disability is not good enough. As for actors with disabilities playing random characters - they have to get agents, audition, and make their case like any aspiring actor that there would be no financial disadvantage or distraction in casting them. Diversity clauses will help tremendously but it will take some time to transition in.

And how many Deaf characters are actually portrayed by deaf actresses/ deaf actors?

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