Watch Our Video If she can see it,
she can be it.™
Watch It.
Share it.
Help spread the word.

Research

Our extensive research provides ground breaking data on women and girls in media.

Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media Research

Education

Check out our curricula to teach your students how to be savvy media consumers.

Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media Education

Donate Today

Your donations further our research and fund curriculum development for young children.

Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media Donate

Gender in Media News

Friday, April 19, 2019

It’s Friday! ⠀

Catch Someone Great, premiering on Netflix tonight! Support this incredible film directed by @jennkaytin, an inspiring female director AND writer. It also stars @hereisgina, @BrittanySnow and @DeWandaWise.⠀ ⠀

⁣An aspiring music journalist, Jenny (Gina Rodriguez), has just landed her dream job at an iconic magazine and is about to move to San Francisco. Rather than do long distance, her boyfriend of nine years decides to call it quits. To nurse her broken heart, Jenny gathers up her two best friends, Erin (DeWanda Wise) and Blair (Brittany Snow), for one outrageous last adventure in New York City.⁣⠀⠀

We had the honor of hosting an exclusive early screening of #SomeoneGreat at @netflix for our members! ⠀

To learn more about becoming a member and having access to all our events, screenings, meet Geena, influencers, and becoming part of a community of progressive like minded people follow the link in bio. ⠀

seejane.org/membership/



#GeenaDavis #womeninfilm #girlsinfilm #girlsinmedia #ifshecanseeitshecanbeit #womeninhollywood #womeninmedia #genderequality #movies #womeninfilm #filmmaking #film #filmmaker #director #screenwriting #cinema #onset #filming #femalefilmmaker #representationmatters #womeninstem
... See MoreSee Less

It’s Friday! ⠀
⠀
Catch Someone Great, premiering on Netflix tonight! Support this incredible film directed by @jennkaytin, an inspiring female director AND writer. It also stars @hereisgina, @BrittanySnow and @DeWandaWise.⠀ ⠀
⠀
⁣An aspiring music journalist, Jenny (Gina Rodriguez), has just landed her dream job at an iconic magazine and is about to move to San Francisco. Rather than do long distance, her boyfriend of nine years decides to call it quits. To nurse her broken heart, Jenny gathers up her two best friends, Erin (DeWanda Wise) and Blair (Brittany Snow), for one outrageous last adventure in New York City.⁣⠀⠀
⠀
We had the honor of hosting an exclusive early screening of #SomeoneGreat at @netflix for our members! ⠀
⠀
To learn more about becoming a member and having access to all our events, screenings, meet Geena, influencers, and becoming part of a community of progressive like minded people follow the link in bio. ⠀
⠀
https://seejane.org/membership/⠀
⠀
⠀
⠀
#GeenaDavis #womeninfilm #girlsinfilm #girlsinmedia #ifshecanseeitshecanbeit #womeninhollywood #womeninmedia #genderequality #movies #womeninfilm #filmmaking #film #filmmaker #director #screenwriting #cinema #onset #filming #femalefilmmaker #representationmatters #womeninstem

Comment on Facebook

Watched it last night. It was so, so good!!!

jspp.psychopen.eu/article/view/94 “Finally, connections between objectification and genocide perpetration, as well as between self-objectification and collective action, are described. It is concluded that the objectification of other people contributes to societal change that runs counter to principles of equality and respect for others, threatens civil rights, and ultimately can result in genocide or mass killings. Furthermore, self-objectification impairs the ability of oppressed groups to act collectively on their own behalf. In contrast, the process of decolonization supports collective action and positive societal change, in part because it liberates oppressed people from self-objectification.”

"Women are objectified through overt sexualization and through a focus on physical appearance, but empirical research has not yet made this distinction. In three studies, we found evidence consistent with the hypothesis that although both forms of objectification strip women of their humanness, there are unique dehumanizing signatures associated with each. When women were objectified by a focus on their sexual features or functions ( sexual objectification), they were perceived as lacking uniquely human attributes (i.e., animalistic dehumanization). Conversely, when women were objectified by an emphasis on their beauty or physical appearance ( appearance-focused objectification), they were perceived as lacking human nature (i.e., mechanistic dehumanization). In Study 3, we also examined an outcome associated with women's risk of harm and found that mechanistic dehumanization, in response to appearance-focused objectification, uniquely promoted the perception that a woman was less capable of feeling pain. Implications for objectification research are discussed."https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29673296

IF SHE CAN SEE IT, SHE CAN BE IT
You have the power to change the
face of children's programming.

With your help, if she can see it, she can be it.

Your donation will further our research efforts and
fund continuing curriculum development for young children.

How would you like to support the Institute?

Starts at $250 for Individuals
and $5,000 for Corporations

Do you have questions about donating to the institute?
Please contact Elizabeth Kilpatrick via email or call 714-475-3885.